AMEs IN HISTORY

A. Philip Randolph

A. Philip Randolph (April 15, 1889 – May 16, 1979) was a leader in the African-American civil-rights movement, and the American labor movement. He was a Preacher’s Kid and member of the AME Church.
Asa Philip Randolph was very active black man in his time.

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Alcee L. Hastings

Alcee L. Hastings represents his native state of Florida by serving as Congressman for District 20, which includes parts of Broward, Palm Beach, and Hendry Counties. Congressman Hastings was first elected in 1992 and is currently serving his 11th term in the Congress.

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Benjamin Banneker

Benjamin Banneker was an African-American astronomer, clockmaker, and publisher who was instrumental in surveying the District of Columbia.
He was born in Maryland on November 9, 1731. His maternal grandmother, Molly

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Benjamin Tucker Tanner

Benjamin Tucker Tanner was born on December 25th in 1835. He was a Black minister and bishop in the AME Church.
Benjamin Tucker Tanner was born on Christmas day of 1835 to Hugh and Isabella Tanner of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

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Bridget “Biddy” Mason

Bridget “Biddy” Mason was born on August 8, 1915. She was a once illiterate Black slave woman who worked as a nurse/midwife and then walked from Mississippi to California to become a successful entrepreneur and a generous contributor to social causes.

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Daisy Lee Gaston Bates

Daisy Lee Gaston Bates was born on November 11, 1914, in Huttig, Arkansas. She married journalist Christopher Bates and they operated a weekly African-American newspaper, the Arkansas State Press. Bates became president of the Arkansas chapter of the

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Richard Allen

RICHARD ALLEN – First Elected and Consecrated Bishop in the AME Church
The AME Church grew out of the Free African Society (FAS), which Richard Allen, Absalom Jones, and other free blacks established in Philadelphia in 1787. They left St. George’s Methodist Episcopal Church because of discrimination.

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Rosa Parks

Rosa Parks was born on February 4, 1913. She was an African American civil rights activist and “catalyst” for the 2nd Civil Rights Movement known as the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

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Roy Wilkins

Roy Wilkins was born on August 30, 1901, in St. Louis, Missouri , Roy Wilkins worked as a journalist/activist before becoming involved with the NAACP, succeeding Walter White as its leader in the 1950s. Wilkins was a major figure of the Civil Rights Movement and was involved in an array of key events, including the Brown v. Board of Education ruling and the March on Washington.

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Stephanie Wilson

Stephanie Diana Wilson, the only child of Barbara and Eugene Wilson arrived on planet earth in Pittesfield, Mass. on Sept 27, 1966. She is an American engineer and a NASA astronaut. She flew on her first mission in space on board the Space Shuttle mission STS-121, and is the second African American woman to go into space, after Mae Jemison.

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Tom Bradley

Tom Bradley, in full Thomas Bradley (born December 29, 1917, Calvert, Texas, U.S.—died September 29, 1998, Los Angeles, California), American politician, the first African American mayor of a predominantly white city, who served an unprecedented five terms as mayor of Los Angeles (1973–93).

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Vernon Jordan

Vernon Eulion Jordan, Jr. (born August 15, 1935) is an African-American lawyer, business executive and civil rights activist in the United States. A leading figure in the civil rights movement, he was chosen by President Bill Clinton as a close adviser. Jordan has become known as an influential figure in American politics.

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Yvette Clarke

Yvette D. Clarke is a Brooklyn native whose roots are firmly planted in her Jamaican heritage. A product of the New York City Public School System, Rep. Clarke graduated from Oberlin College and was a recipient of the prestigious APPAM/Sloan Fellowship in Public Policy and Policy Analysis.

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